Category Archives: Reviews

Legion

Legion
Brandon Sanderson

Legion was a fascinating read. I was already a fan of Sanderson’s writing, but this story surprised me with just how much I enjoyed it. Only 88 pages, but I was hooked – the characters, the plot, the ending, everything. I am very much looking forward to the next installment.

Black

Black
Russell Blake

Black is kind of a modern, mainstream detective story, which is to say that it’s not the kind of book I tend to gravitate toward. That said, it was a lot of fun. The title character is a somewhat typical, down on his luck PI who gets wrapped up in a case that actually managed to have a few interesting (and violent) twists along the way, but it was his sassy receptionist who really got me hooked.

Good Omens

Good Omens
Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman

The Apocalypse is no laughing matter, unless, of course, you happen to be Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett… in which case the impending End of Days is a comedy of errors just waiting to unravel before you.

If you’re looking for a unique, witty romp to the end of the world starring angels, demons, and the antichrist himself, look no further than Good Omens.

Life of Pi

Life of Pi
Yann Martel

Meh. Life of Pi was ok. On many a recommendation, I dutifully trudged through this book. And I do mean trudged. It started off well enough, but the lengthy middle of the book just went on and on… and on some more, and while that served to really drive home the lost at sea thing, it became tiresome enough to detract from my enjoyment of the book and my motivation to even finish it. I wasn’t exactly surprised by the ending, but it was hardly a fulfilling conclusion to the ordeal.

Another Fine Myth

Another Fine Myth
Robert Aspirin

Another Fine Myth is a long time favorite of mine. First acquired on a whim at a used book store, I read it in an evening.

Aspirin offers a light-hearted, witty, comedic take on the traditional high fantasy themes and icons.

Magic? Check.
Dragons? Check.
Knights? Check.
Dull, predictable plot-line? Not even a little.

This was a third or fourth (maybe even fifth!) reading, and it hasn’t lost any of the fun.

Veronika Decides to Die

Veronika Decides to Die
Paulo Coehlo

Several people, over the years, have recommended this book. Having now completed a reading of this book, I understand the recommendations. It was quite interesting. A unique exploration of sanity, insanity, and the intersections therein.

Told from the perspectives of various patients and a doctor, the novel explores life in a Slovenian mental hospital, particularly in regard to the influence spread by the presence of the title character, Veronika.

It was an interesting look at the inner workings of a mental institute and mental illness in general. Appropriately uncomfortable at times, Coelho’s story encourages the reader to confront the kind of discomfort that people tend to shy away from in real life. This one will make you think.

Not my usual fare (I tend to gravitate toward fantasy, science fiction, and the like), I found myself, nonetheless, intrigued by the plot and characters. And, while this is not likely to be a book whose company I seek again, I am glad to have experienced its’ journey.

To Your Scattered Bodies Go

To Your Scattered Bodies Go
Philip José Farmer

This was a fascinating tale. It really made me think about mortality, the afterlife, and what it means to really be alive. Farmer creates a vivid alien world, a unique premise, and interesting characters, however I found it to be a bit of a slow read, and some of the dialogue felt a bit clunky. If you enjoy classic science fiction, I would call this a must-read, others might find it challenging to complete.